Legislative Action Center

FAITH AND VALUES-BASED ADVOCACY TOOLKIT

We, at the Interfaith Alliance of Colorado firmly believe that you and your networks have a voice in how legislative bills turn out. Our shared values guide our work.  It is up to all Coloradans to preserve our democracy and promote our values of dignity, equality, and opportunity for all by making our voices heard. This Advocacy Guide will help you to do that.

Interfaith Alliance of Colorado: Advocacy Toolkit


Don’t know who represents you at the Colorado General Assembly? Find your Colorado state legislators.

For the most up-to-date status on bills, click here.

The Colorado General Assembly Website

Want to support us as we testify? See our calendar for event dates

The Interfaith Alliance of Colorado has been tracking bills and has provided testimony for bills that address our current public policy priorities of upholding religious freedom, providing economic justice, and standing up for racial justice.

Since these are broad areas of interest and can include multiple intersectional issues, our Public Policy Commission decides which bills to support, either through bringing people to testify, writing opinions and advocating among our membership, or signing on in public statements.

Current Legislative Session

Sponsors: Rep. Buckner, Sen. Kerr

Summary:

Concerning the ability of an employee of an employer who employs at least fifty employees to take up to eighteen hours of leave from work for purposes of attending his or her child’s academic activities.

In 2009, the general assembly enacted the ‘Parental Involvement in K-12 Education Act’ (2009 act), which allowed an employee of an employer who is subject to the federal ‘Family and Medical Leave Act of 1993’ to take leave from work for the purpose of attending academic activities for or with the employee’s child. Under the 2009 act, academic activities included parent-teacher conferences or meetings related to special education services, interventions, dropout prevention, attendance, truancy, or discipline issues. The leave was allowed for an employee who is the parent or legal guardian of a child enrolled in a public or private school or in a nonpublic home-based educational program in this state in kindergarten through twelfth grade.

Leave under the 2009 act was limited to 6 hours per month and 18 hours in any academic year. The 2009 act permitted employers to:

  • Restrict the use of leave in cases of emergency or other situations that may endanger a person’s health or safety or if the employee’s absence would halt the employer’s service or production; and
  • Limit the leave to 3-hour increments at a time and require the employee to submit written verification from the school or school district of the activity necessitating the leave.

An employee was required to provide the employer with at least one week’s notice of the leave except in emergency situations.

The 2009 act specified that the 2009 act would repeal on September 1, 2015. The repeal provision was never amended, so the 2009 act repealed on September 1, 2015.

The bill recreates and reenacts the 2009 act with the following modifications:

  • School districts and institute charter schools must post on their websites, and include in district-wide or school-wide communications sent to parents and the community at large, information about the act;
  • The Colorado state advisory council for parent involvement in education must also provide information about the act to the extent possible within existing resources; and
  • The act continues indefinitely and the original repeal date in the 2009 act is amended to specify that the repeal was to apply only to the 2009 act.

Position: Support

Status: 01/11/2017 Introduced In House – Assigned to Education;
02/06/2017 House Committee on Education Refer Unamended to House Committee of the Whole

02/09/2017 House Second Reading Passed – No Amendments

02/10/2017 House Third Reading Passed – No Amendments

02/24/2017 Introduced In Senate – Assigned to State, Veterans, & Military Affairs

03/15/2017 Senate Committee on State, Veterans, & Military Affairs Postpone Indefinitely

 

See the bill here

Sponsors: Reps. Humphrey and Williams, Sens. Neville and Marble

Summary:

  • Specifies that no state action may burden a person’s exercise of religion, even if the burden results from a rule of general applicability, unless it is demonstrated that applying the burden to a person’s exercise of religion is essential to further a compelling governmental interest and the least restrictive means of furthering that compelling governmental interest;
  • Defines ‘exercise of religion’ as the practice or observance of religion. The bill specifies that exercise of religion includes the ability to act or refuse to act in a manner substantially motivated by a person’s sincerely held religious beliefs, whether or not the exercise is compulsory or central to a larger system of religious belief; except that it does not include the ability to act or refuse to act based on race or ethnicity.
  • Provides a claim or defense to a person whose exercise of religion is burdened by state action; and
  • Specifies that nothing in the bill creates any rights by an employee against an employer unless the employer is a government employer.

Position: Opposed

Status: 01/11/2017 Introduced In House – Assigned to State, Veterans, & Military Affairs;
01/25/2017 House Committee on State, Veterans, & Military Affairs – Postponed Indefinitely

See the bill here

Sponsors: Rep. Salazar

Summary:

The bill mandates funding instruction in public schools of history and civil government of the United States and Colorado, including but not limited to the history, culture, and contributions of American Indians, Hispanic Americans, African Americans, and Asian Americans.

Current law requires school districts to convene community forums to discuss the content standards in history and civil government at least once every 10 years. The bill requires the forums to be held at least every 2 years.

The history, culture, and civil government in education commission is established to make recommendations to the state board of education when the state board performs the scheduled review of education standards in 2018 so those standards and programs accurately reflect the history, culture, and civil government of the United States and Colorado, including the contributions and influence of American Indians, Hispanic Americans, African Americans, and Asian Americans.

Position: Support

Status: 01/11/2017 Introduced In House – Assigned to Education;
01/30/2017 1:30 pm  |  HCR 0112 House Committee on Education; Refer Unamended to Appropriations

04/28/2017  House Committee on Appropriations Refer Amended to House Committee of the Whole

04/28/2017 House Second Reading Special Order – Passed with Amendments

05/01/2017 House Third Reading Passed – No Amendments

05/01/2017 Introduced In Senate – Assigned to State, Veterans, & Military Affairs

05/03/2017 Senate Committee on State, Veterans, & Military Affairs  –  Postpone Indefinitely

See the bill here

Sponsors: Rep. Herod, Sen. B. Gardner

Summary:

Concerning a voluntary contribution designation benefiting the Urban Peak Housing and Support Services for Youth Experiencing Homelessness fund that appears on the state individual tax return forms.

The bill creates the Urban Peak Housing and Support Services for Youth Experiencing Homelessness fund (fund) in the state treasury. A voluntary contribution designation line for the fund will appear on the state individual income tax return form (form) for the 5 income tax years following the year that the executive director of the department of revenue (department) certifies to the revisor of statutes that:

  • There is a space available on the form; and
  • The fund is next in the queue.

Once the fund is placed on the form, the department is directed to determine annually the total amount contributed to the fund and report that amount to the state treasurer and the general assembly. The state treasurer is required to credit that amount to the fund, and the general assembly appropriates from the fund to the department the costs of administering moneys designated for the fund. After that amount is deducted, the moneys remaining in the fund at the end of a fiscal year are transferred to Urban Peak, a nonprofit organization.

Following the statutory 2-year grace period for new tax check-offs, the fund is required to achieve the minimum contribution amount of $50,000 per year to remain on the form.

Position: Support

Status: 01/11/2017 Introduced In House – Assigned to Finance;
01/30/2017 1:30 pm  |  LSB A  – House Committee on Finance; Refer Unamended to House Committee of the Whole

02/02/2017 9:00 am  |  House Chamber – House Floor Work

02/03/2017 House Second Reading Passed – No Amendments

02/06/2017 House Third Reading Passed – No Amendments

02/06/2017 Introduced In Senate – Assigned to Finance

02/21/2017 | 2:00 pm   SCR 357 | Senate Committe on Finance

02/24/2017 Senate Second Reading Laid Over Daily – No Amendments

02/27/2017 Senate Second Reading Passed – No Amendments

02/28/2017 Senate Third Reading Passed – No Amendments

03/06/2017 Signed by the Speaker of the House

03/07/2017 Signed by the President of the Senate

03/08/2017 Sent to the Governor

03/16/2017 Governor Signed – Became Law

See the bill here

Sponsors: Rep. Neville

Summary:

The bill requires all abortion clinics to file an annual registration with the attorney general. The attorney general shall create and make available the registration form. While keeping identifying information of any women who sought an abortion private, the registration form must include the following information:

  • The number of abortions performed at the clinic during the previous year, including the trimester in which the abortion was performed, based on appropriately maintained records kept by the clinic;
  • A specific report for each abortion performed at or after 20 weeks’ gestation;
  • A description of the method or methods of abortion performed at the clinic;
  • The name of each physician performing abortions at the clinic, along with the state of each physician’s licensure, any board certifications or specialties maintained by the physician, and any disciplinary action taken against the physician in the last 5 years;
  • The number of babies born alive at the clinic during the year, whether the babies were born prior to, during, or after the attempted completion of an abortion, whether or not these babies survived, whether or not they were viable, and whether or not they were transported to a hospital; and
  • The number of patients, including women and born-alive infants, who were transported to a hospital from the clinic following a partially or fully completed abortion in the previous year.

The attorney general has 30 days to reject an inaccurate or incomplete registration form and 30 days from the date of discovery to reject a form that contains false or fraudulent information. Failure to file a registration form or operating without a registration form subjects an abortion clinic to a fine, a suspension, or closure. All registration forms and inspection or investigation forms are public records.

The attorney general has a duty to inspect, without notice, each registered abortion clinic at least annually. At a minimum, each inspection must determine whether the abortion clinic is performing abortions at or after 20 weeks’ gestation and whether it is operating with:

  • Medically modern ultrasound equipment;
  • Equipment to preserve the life of and to resuscitate born-alive infants;
  • Legally approved methods of medical and hazardous waste disposal;
  • Medically safe standards for sterilization of instruments and procedure areas and storage, medically safe policies for expired and opened medicines, and emergency exits sufficient to accommodate a stretcher or gurney; and
  • Proper ‘Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996’ policies.

If the attorney general finds an inspection violation, he or she may impose a fine up to $5,000 or impose a suspension or closure of the abortion clinic.

Position: Opposed

Status: 01/18/2017 Introduced In House – Assigned to Health, Insurance, & Environment + Appropriations;
02/09/2017 1:30 pm  |  RM 271House Committee on Health, Insurance, & Environment

02/09/2017 House Committee on Health, Insurance, & Environment – Postpone Indefinitely

See the bill here

Sponsors: Reps. Everett and Nordberg, Sen. Marble

Summary:

The bill ensures that a woman is given information regarding the possibility of an abortion pill reversal so that she is fully informed and is given options to continue the pregnancy and preserve the mother-child relationship when she desires to do so. The department of public health and environment must publish a statement on its website regarding abortion pill reversal. The woman’s doctor shall provide her with this statement at least 24 hours before providing the abortion pill.

Position: Opposed

Status: 01/18/2017 Introduced In House – Assigned to Health, Insurance, & Environment;
02/09/2017 1:30 pm  |  RM 271 House Committee on Health, Insurance, & Environment

02/09/2017 House Committee on Health, Insurance, & Environment – Postpone Indefinitely

See the bill here

Sponsors: Rep. Leonard

Summary:

Concerning the termination of state funding for higher education institutions that engage in the trafficking of aborted human body parts.

Each higher education institution that receives funding from the state must file a verified report each December 1 with the joint budget committee stating whether or not the institution engaged, directly or indirectly, in the purchase or trafficking of aborted human body parts in the previous year. If a higher education institution files a report affirming that the institution engaged, directly or indirectly, in the purchase or trafficking of aborted human body parts, the general assembly shall not appropriate any state funding in the next fiscal year.

Position: Opposed

Status: 01/19/2017 Introduced In House – Assigned to State, Veterans, & Military Affairs;
02/15/2017 1:30 pm  |  LSB A House Committee on State, Veterans, & Military Affairs

02/15/2017 House Committee on State, Veterans, & Military Affairs – Postpone Indefinitely

See the bill here

Sponsors: Reps. Humphrey and Ransom, Sen. Neville

Summary:

The bill prohibits terminating the life of an unborn child and makes a violation a class 1 felony. The following are exceptions to the prohibition

  • A licensed physician performs a medical procedure designed or intended to prevent the death of a pregnant mother, if the physician makes reasonable medical efforts under the circumstances to preserve both the life of the mother and the life of her unborn child in a manner consistent with conventional medical practice; and
  • A licensed physician provides medical treatment, including chemotherapy and the removal of an ectopic pregnancy, to the mother that results in the accidental or unintentional injury to or death of the unborn child.

The pregnant mother upon whom termination of the life of an unborn child is performed or attempted is not subject to a criminal penalty. The sale and use of contraception is not prohibited by the bill. A conviction related to the prohibition of the termination of the life of an unborn child constitutes unprofessional conduct for purposes of physician licensing.

Position: Opposed

Status: 01/19/2017 Introduced In House – Assigned to Health, Insurance, & Environment;
02/09/2017 1:30 pm  |  RM 271 House Committee on Health, Insurance, & Environment

02/09/2017 House Committee on Health, Insurance, & Environment – Postpone Indefinitely

See the bill here

Sponsors: Reps. Hamner and Exum, Sen. Martinez Humenik

Summary:

Concerning the continuation of energy-related assistance to low-income households.

Current law provides that the department of human services low-income energy assistance fund, the energy outreach Colorado low-income energy assistance fund, and the Colorado energy office low-income energy assistance fund receive conditional funding from the severance tax operational fund through the state fiscal year commencing July 1, 2018. The bill removes the automatic repeal which means that these funds will be eligible for this conditional funding indefinitely.

Position: Support

Status: 01/20/2017 Introduced In House – Assigned to Transportation & Energy;
02/16/2017 Upon Adjournment  |  HCR 0112 – House Committee on Transportation & Energy

03/03/2017 House Committee on Appropriations Refer Unamended to House Committee of the Whole

03/07/2017 House Second Reading Passed with Amendments – Committee

03/08/2017 House Third Reading Laid Over Daily – No Amendments

03/09/2017 House Third Reading Passed – No Amendments

03/10/2017 Introduced In Senate – Assigned to Agriculture, Natural Resources, & Energy

03/23/2017  |  1:30 pm  SCR 357  | Senate on Agriculture, Natural Resources, & Energy

05/05/2017 Senate Committee on Appropriations Refer Unamended to Senate Committee of the Whole

05/09/2017 Senate Second Reading Passed – No Amendments

05/10/2017 Senate Third Reading Passed – No Amendments

See the bill here

Sponsors: Rep. Esgar, Sen. Moreno

Summary:

Concerning the issuance of a new birth certificate with a gender designation that differs from the gender designated on the person’s original birth certificate.

Under current law, a person born in Colorado who seeks a new birth certificate from the registrar of vital statistics (state registrar) to reflect a change in gender designation must obtain a court order indicating that the sex of the person has been changed by surgical procedure and ordering that the gender designation on the birth certificate be amended, and the person must obtain a court order with a legal name change. The bill repeals that provision and creates new requirements for the issuance of birth certificates in cases of changes to gender designation.

Under the bill, known as the ‘2017 Birth Certificate Modernization Act’, the state registrar shall issue a new birth certificate with a different gender designation to a person who was born in this state when the state registrar receives:

  • A written request from the person or the person’s legal representative requesting a new birth certificate with a gender designation that differs from the gender designated on the person’s original birth certificate; and
  • A statement from a medical or mental health care provider licensed in good standing stating that the person has undergone treatment appropriate for that person for the purpose of gender transition or stating that the person has an intersex condition, and that in the provider’s professional opinion the person’s gender designation should be changed accordingly.

The bill requires that the state registrar issue a new birth certificate rather than an amended birth certificate. The bill allows a person who has previously obtained an amended birth certificate under previous versions of the law to apply to receive a new birth certificate.

A person is not required to obtain a court order for a legal name change in order to obtain a new birth certificate with a change in gender designation. The bill creates a process for a person to update the person’s name on a birth certificate at other times than the issuance of the new birth certificate.

The state registrar is prohibited from requesting additional medical information but is authorized to contact the medical or mental health provider to verify the provider’s statement. The courts in this state are given jurisdiction to issue a decree to amend a birth certificate to reflect a change in gender designation for certain persons if the law in another state or foreign jurisdiction requires a court decree in order to amend a birth certificate to reflect a change in gender designation.

Position: Support

Status: 01/24/2017 Introduced In House – Assigned to Judiciary;

03/09/2017  |  1:30 pm  HCR 0112  | House Committee on Judiciary

03/14/2017 House Second Reading Passed – No Amendments

03/15/2017 House Third Reading Passed – No Amendments

03/17/2017 Introduced In Senate – Assigned to State, Veterans, & Military Affairs

03/27/2017 Senate Committee on State, Veterans, & Military Affairs – Postpone Indefinitely

See the bill here

Sponsors: Rep. Williams, Sen. Marble

Summary:

Concerning holding Colorado government accountable for creating sanctuary jurisdiction policies.

The bill is known as the ‘Colorado Politician Accountability Act’.

The bill includes a legislative declaration that states that addressing sanctuary jurisdictions is a matter of statewide concern and that makes findings about how sanctuary policies are contrary to federal law and state interests.

The bill creates a civil remedy against the state or a political subdivision of the state (jurisdiction) and against its elected officials for creating sanctuary policies. The bill also creates a crime of rendering assistance to an illegal alien that can be brought against an elected official for creating a sanctuary jurisdiction.

An elected official is responsible for the creation of a sanctuary jurisdiction if the elected official votes in favor of imposing or creating a law, ordinance, or policy that allows the jurisdiction to operate as a sanctuary jurisdiction, fails to take steps to try to change a law, ordinance, or policy that allows the jurisdiction to operate as a sanctuary jurisdiction, or is a county sheriff who imposes or enforces a policy that allows the jurisdiction to operate as a sanctuary jurisdiction in a county in which the elected officials have not voted to impose or create a sanctuary jurisdiction.

The bill allows any person who claims that he or she is a victim of any crime committed by an illegal alien who established residency in a sanctuary jurisdiction to file a civil action for compensatory damages against a jurisdiction and against the elected officials of the jurisdiction who were responsible for creating the policy to operate as a sanctuary jurisdiction. Notwithstanding the protections of the ‘Colorado Governmental Immunity Act’, the jurisdiction and its officials who are responsible for creating a sanctuary jurisdiction are civilly liable for damages if the person who engaged in the criminal activity:

  • Is determined to be an illegal alien;
  • Had established residency in the sanctuary jurisdiction; and
  • Is convicted of the crime that is a proximate cause of the injury to a person or property.

The maximum amount of compensatory damages for injury to persons is $700,000 per person or $1,980,000 for injury to 2 or more persons; except that no person may recover in excess of $700,000. The maximum amount of compensatory damages for injury to property is set at $350,000 per person or $990,000 for injury to multiple persons; except that no person may recover in excess of $350,000.

The bill defines a ‘sanctuary jurisdiction’ as a jurisdiction that adopts a law, ordinance, or policy on or after the effective date of this bill that prohibits or in any way restricts an official or employee of the jurisdiction from:

  • Cooperating and complying with federal immigration officials or enforcing federal immigration law;
  • Sending to or receiving from or requesting from federal immigration officials information regarding the citizenship or immigration status, lawful or unlawful, of an individual;
  • Maintaining or exchanging information about an individual’s immigration status, lawful or unlawful, with other federal agencies, state agencies, or municipalities;
  • Inquiring about an individual’s name, date and place of birth, and immigration status while enforcing or conducting an official investigation into a violation of any law of this state;
  • Continuing to detain an individual, regardless of the individual’s ability to be released on bail, who has been identified as an illegal alien while in custody for violating any state law; or
  • Verifying the lawful presence and eligibility of a person applying for a state or local public benefit as required by state and federal law.

The bill sets forth the requirements for determining when an illegal alien has established residency in a sanctuary jurisdiction. An ‘illegal alien’ is defined as a person who is not lawfully present within the United States, as determined by federal immigration law.

The governing body of any jurisdiction is prohibited from adopting a law, ordinance, rule, policy, or plan or taking any action that limits or prohibits an elected official, employee, or law enforcement officer from communicating or cooperating with an appropriate public official, employee, or law enforcement officer of the federal government concerning the immigration status of an individual residing in the state. The governing body of a jurisdiction is required to provide written notice to each elected official, employee, and law enforcement officer of the jurisdiction of his or her duty to communicate and cooperate with the federal government concerning enforcement of any federal or state immigration law. The governing body of any jurisdiction in this state is required to annually submit a written report to the department of public safety (department) that the jurisdiction is in compliance with the cooperation and communication requirements. If the department does not receive those written reports, the department is required to provide the name of that jurisdiction to the state controller.

A law enforcement officer of a jurisdiction who has reasonable cause to believe that an individual under arrest is not lawfully present in the United States shall immediately report the individual to the appropriate U.S. immigration and customs enforcement office (ICE) within the department of homeland security. The governing body of any jurisdiction is required to report annually to the department on the number of individuals who were reported to ICE by law enforcement officers from that jurisdiction. The department is directed to compile and submit annual reports on compliance to the general assembly and to the state controller. The state controller is required to withhold the payment of any state funds to any jurisdiction that is found by the department to have failed to comply with these reporting requirements. The state controller shall withhold funds until the department notifies the state controller that the jurisdiction is in compliance.

The bill creates the crime of rendering assistance to an illegal alien through a sanctuary jurisdiction, which is a class 4 felony. A person who is an elected official of a jurisdiction commits rendering assistance to an illegal alien through a sanctuary jurisdiction if, with intent to hinder, delay, or prevent the discovery, detection, apprehension, prosecution, conviction, or punishment of illegal aliens within the jurisdiction:

  • He or she was responsible for creating a sanctuary jurisdiction in the jurisdiction to which the official is elected; and
  • When, as a result of the protection afforded by a sanctuary jurisdiction, a third person engages in criminal activity and the third person:
  • Is an illegal alien as legally defined by federal immigration law;
  • Had established residency in the sanctuary jurisdiction that was created by the official; and
  • Has been convicted of a crime that caused injury to a person or to property.

A person who has knowledge of a crime committed by an illegal alien as a result of the creation of a sanctuary jurisdiction may file an affidavit with the attorney general or with a district attorney outlining the crime and requesting that charges be brought or that a grand jury be impaneled. The attorney general or district attorney shall investigate and respond in writing with his or her decision to the person filing the affidavit within 49 days. If the attorney general or district attorney declines to bring charges or impanel a grand jury, the person may file a second affidavit directly with the applicable court.

The bill includes a severability clause and a provision that states that the bill is not subject to judicial review.

The bill takes effect upon passage and applies to acts or omissions occurring on or after said date.

Position: Opposed

Status: 01/30/2017 Introduced In House – Assigned to State, Veterans, & Military Affairs + Judiciary

02/22/2017 | 1:30pm LSB A | House Committee on State, Veterans, & Military Affairs – Postpone Indefinitely
See the bill here

Sponsors: Rep. Rosenthal, Sen. Fenberg

Summary:

Concerning a prohibition on conversion therapy by a licensed mental health care provider.
The bill prohibits a licensed physician specializing in psychiatry or a licensed or registered mental health care provider from engaging in conversion therapy with a patient under 18 years of age. A licensee who engages in these efforts is subject to disciplinary action by the appropriate licensing board. ‘Conversion therapy’ means efforts that seek to change an individual’s sexual orientation, including efforts to change behaviors or gender expressions or to eliminate or reduce sexual or romantic attraction or feelings toward individuals of the same sex.

Position: Support

Status: 02/06/2017 Introduced In House – Assigned to Public Health Care & Human Services;
02/28/2017  |  1:30 pm RM 271  | House Committee on Public Health Care & Human Services

03/02/2017 House Second Reading Laid Over to 03/06/2017 – No Amendments

03/06/2017 House Second Reading Passed – No Amendments

03/07/2017 House Third Reading Passed – No Amendments

03/10/2017 Introduced In Senate – Assigned to State, Veterans, & Military Affairs

03/22/2017  Senate on State, Veterans, & Military Affairs – Postpone Indefinitely


See the bill here

Sponsors: Rep. J. Becker, Sen. Cooke

Summary:

Concerning actions related to forcible entry and detainer.

The bill adds to the current descriptions of forcible detainer the act of a person preventing an owner from access to or possession of property by locking or changing the lock on the property.

The bill creates a procedure for the plaintiff to seek a temporary, mandatory injunction giving the plaintiff possession of the property if a complaint for forcible entry or detainer is filed. The procedure requires the plaintiff to store any personal property found on the property but allows the plaintiff to recover the costs of the storage.

The bill establishes as new crimes related to forcible entry and detainer the crimes of unlawful occupancy and unlawful reentry.

Position: Oppose

Status: 02/06/2017 Introduced In House – Assigned to Judiciary, Appropriations;

04/27/2017  | 1:30 pm   HCR 0112  | House Committee on Judiciary

04/27/2017 House Committee on Judiciary – Postpone Indefinitely

 

See the bill here

Sponsors: Reps. Pettersen & Landgraf, Sen. Coram

Summary:

Concerning a requirement that health benefit plans required to cover contraception reimburse dispensers for dispensing a multiple-months’ supply of prescription contraceptives.

The bill requires individual and group sickness and accident policies, contracts, or plans that are required under current law to provide contraception coverage to reimburse participating providers or in-network dispensing entities for:

  • Dispensing prescription contraceptives in a 3-month supply for the first dispensing to the insured person and for a 12-month supply for subsequent dispensings of the same prescription contraceptive to the insured person; or
  • Dispensing to the insured person a prescribed vaginal contraceptive ring intended to last for 3 months.

‘Prescription contraceptive’ is defined as a medically acceptable oral drug or contraceptive patch that is used to prevent pregnancy and that requires a prescription.

Position: Support

Status: 02/14/2017 Introduced In House – Assigned to Health, Insurance, and Environment;

03/09/2017 House Committee on Health, Insurance, & Environment Refer Amended to House Committee of the Whole

03/16/2017 House Second Reading Passed with Amendments

04/05/2017  Senate Committee on State, Veteran, & Military Affairs

04/10/2017 Senate Second Reading Laid Over Daily – No Amendments

04/11/2017 Senate Second Reading Passed – No Amendments

04/12/2017 Senate Third Reading Laid Over to 04/17/2017 – No Amendments

04/17/2017 Senate Third Reading Passed – No Amendments

05/01/2017 Signed by the Speaker of the House

05/01/2017 Signed by the President of the Senate

05/02/2017 Sent to the Governor

 

See the bill here

Sponsors: Rep. Thurlow, Sen. Crowder

Summary:

Concerning a change to the growth factor in the excess state revenues cap.

In 2005, voters approved Referendum C, which is a voter-approved revenue change to the TABOR fiscal year spending limit. Under the referendum, the state is permitted to retain and spend all state revenues up to the excess state revenues cap. The excess state revenues cap is adjusted annually for inflation and population changes, among other things.

The bill modifies the excess state revenues cap by allowing an annual adjustment for an increase based on the average annual change of Colorado personal income over the last 5 years, rather than adjusting for inflation and population. Colorado personal income is the total personal income for Colorado as reported by a federal agency. As the modification may increase the amount that the state retains and spends in a given fiscal year, the bill seeks voter approval for the change, as required by TABOR.

Position: Support

Status: 02/14/2017 Introduced In House – Assigned to Finance;

02/27/2017 House Committee on Finance Refer Unamended to Appropriations

03/03/2017 House Committee on Appropriations Refer Unamended to House Committee of the Whole

03/07/2017 House Second Reading Passed with Amendments – Floor

03/08/2017 House Third Reading Laid Over Daily – No Amendments

03/09/2017 House Third Reading Passed – No Amendments

03/10/2017 Introduced In Senate – Assigned to State, Veterans, & Military Affairs

03/20/2017  Senate Committee on State, Veterans, & Military Affairs – Postpone Indefinitely

See the bill here

Sponsors: Reps. Herod & Becker

Summary:

Concerning a requirement that staff of the legislative council prepare demographic notes on certain legislative bills.

The bill requires the staff of the legislative council to prepare demographic notes on legislative bills in each regular session of the general assembly. The speaker of the house of representatives, the minority leader of the house of representatives, the president of the senate, and the minority leader of the senate are authorized to request 5 demographic notes each, or more at the discretion of the director of research of the legislative council.

The bill requires the staff of the legislative council to meet with the member of leadership requesting the demographic note and with the sponsor of the legislative bill to discuss whether a demographic note can practically be completed for that legislative bill. If not, the member of leadership may request a demographic note, within the limits specified in the bill, on a different legislative bill that might be more conducive to a demographic note’s analysis.

A demographic note is defined as a note that uses available data to outline the potential disparate effects of a legislative measure on various populations within the state. Populations may be identified by race, gender, disability, age, geography, income, or any other relevant characteristic for which data are available.

The bill requires the director of research to develop the procedures for requesting, completing, and updating the demographic notes and to memorialize the procedures in a letter to the executive committee of the legislative council.

Finally, the bill requires each state department, agency, or institution to cooperate with and provide information for a demographic note of a legislative bill in the manner requested by the staff of the legislative council.

Position: Support

Status: 02/17/2017 Introduced In House – Assigned to Finance;

03/13/2017 House Committee on Finance Refer Unamended to Appropriations

04/28/2017  House Committee on Appropriations Refer Amended to House Committee of the Whole

04/28/2017 House Second Reading Special Order – Passed with Amendments – Committee

05/01/2017 House Third Reading Passed – No Amendments

05/01/2017 Introduced In Senate – Assigned to Finance

05/04/2017 Senate Committee on Finance – Postpone Indefinitely

 

See the bill here

Sponsors: Rep. Winter, Sen. Humenik

Summary:

Concerning the sales tax imposed on diapers.

The bill creates a state sales tax exemption, commencing January 1, 2018, for the sale, storage, and use of diapers. The bill further specifies that local statutory taxing jurisdictions may choose to adopt the same exemption by express inclusion in their sales and use tax ordinance or resolution.

Position: Support

Status: 02/21/2017 Introduced In House – Assigned to Finance, Appropriations;

03/08/2017 House Committee on Finance Refer Unamended to Appropriations

05/05/2017 House Committee on Appropriations – Postpone Indefinitely

See the bill here

Sponsors: Rep. Coleman, Sen. Tate

Summary:

Concerning efforts to encourage employee ownership of the state’s existing small businesses, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation.

The bill requires the Colorado office of economic development (office) to engage the services of a local nonprofit organization that supports and promotes the employee-owned business model to educate the staff at the office on the forms and merits of employee ownership in order for the office to promote employee ownership as part of its small business assistance center.

The bill requires the office to establish and administer a revolving loan program to assist transitions of existing businesses to employee-owned businesses. The bill specifies that the office may enter into a contract, following an open and competitive process, with a local nonprofit organization that supports and promotes the employee-owned business model, a lender, or a community development financial institution to establish and administer the revolving loan program. The bill specifies the types of businesses that may qualify for the program, sets a maximum amount of any loan, and specifies what the loans may and may not be used for. The bill also allows the office to seek matching private sector money to help capitalize the program.

The bill further requires the general assembly to annually appropriate money to the office in order to capitalize the revolving loan program, and allows the office to use a portion of the appropriation for administration of the revolving loan program.

The bill also specifies that the office is required to establish guidelines and post on its website administrative details about the revolving loan program, such as fees, costs, interest rates, and loan terms.

Position: Support

Status: 02/27/2017 Introduced In House – Assigned to Business Affairs & Labor;
03/16/2017  House Committee on Business Affairs & Labor

03/21/2017 House Second Reading Passed with Amendments – Committee, Floor

03/22/2017 House Third Reading Passed – No Amendments

03/23/2017 Introduced In Senate – Assigned to State, Veterans, & Military Affairs

04/10/2017 Senate Second Reading Referred to Business, Labor, & Technology – No Amendments

04/12/2017 Senate Committee on State, Veterans, & Military Affairs Refer Unamended to Senate Committee of the Whole

04/12/2017 Senate Committee on Business, Labor, & Technology Refer Unamended to Senate Committee of the Whole

04/18/2017 Senate Second Reading Laid Over Daily – No Amendments

04/19/2017 Senate Second Reading Passed – No Amendments

04/20/2017 Senate Third Reading Laid Over Daily – No Amendments

04/21/2017 Senate Third Reading Passed – No Amendments

See the bill here

Sponsors: Reps. Salazar & Esgar, Sens. Kagan & Guzman

Summary:

Concerning protection for Colorado residents from federal government overreach based on a person’s status.

The bill prohibits a state or political subdivision from:

  • Providing the race, ethnicity, national origin, immigration status, or religious affiliation of a Colorado resident to the federal government without determining it is for a legal and constitutional purpose;
  • Aiding or assisting the federal government in creating, maintaining, or updating a registry for the purpose of identifying Colorado residents based on race, ethnicity, national origin, immigration status, or religious affiliation;
  • Aiding or assisting the federal government or a federal agency in marking or otherwise placing a physical or electronic identifier on a person based on his or her race, ethnicity, national origin, immigration status, or religious affiliation; and
  • Aiding or assisting, including using state or local lands or resources, the federal government in interning, arresting, or detaining a person based on his or her race, ethnicity, national origin, immigration status, or religious affiliation.

Position: Support

Status: 03/06/2017 Introduced In House – Assigned to Judiciary;

03/16/17  House Committee on Judiciary – Refer Amended to House Committee of the Whole

03/21/2017  House Second Reading Laid Over Daily – No Amendments

03/22/2017 House Second Reading Passed with Amendments – Committee, Floor

03/23/2017 House Third Reading Laid Over to 03/30/2017 – No Amendments

03/30/2017 House Third Reading Passed with Amendments – Floor

04/03/2017 Introduced In Senate – Assigned to Judiciary

04/10/2017 Senate Committee on Judiciary – Postpone Indefinitely

See the bill here

Sponsors: Rep. Herod, Sen. Coram

Summary:

Concerning changing the maximum jail sentence for certain crimes from one year to three hundred sixty-four days.
Under current law, the maximum jail sentence for a class 2 misdemeanor, misdemeanors without a fixed statutory penalty, and municipal ordinance violations is one year. The bill changes the maximum jail sentence to 364 days.

Position: Support

Status: 03/16/2017 Introduced In House – Assigned to Judiciary;

04/18/17 House Committee on Judiciary Refer Unamended to House Committee of the Whole

04/21/2017 House Second Reading Special Order – Laid Over to 04/24/2017 – No Amendments

04/24/2017 House Second Reading Laid Over Daily – No Amendments

04/27/2017 House Second Reading Passed – No Amendments

04/28/2017 House Third Reading Passed – No Amendments

04/28/2017 Introduced In Senate – Assigned to State, Veterans, & Military Affairs

05/03/2017 Senate Committee on State, Veterans, & Military Affairs – Postpone Indefinitely


See the bill here

Sponsors: Reps. Danielson & Nordberg, Sens. Donovan & Martinez Humenik

Summary:

Concerning the repeal of the prohibition of an action against an employee for sharing wage information.
Current law states that it is a discriminatory and unfair labor practice for an employer to discharge, discipline, discriminate against, coerce, intimidate, threaten, or interfere with any employee or other person because the employee inquired about, disclosed, compared, or otherwise discussed the employee’s wages, unless otherwise permitted by federal law. Federal law exempts certain limited classes of employers from labor laws. The bill strikes the reference to that exemption and extends the current law to those classes of employers, thereby providing wage transparency protections to all employees.

Position: Support

Status: 03/16/2017 Introduced In House – Assigned to Business Affairs and Labor;

03/30/2017 House Committee on Business Affairs and Labor Refer Unamended to House Committee of the Whole

04/03/2017 House Second Reading Passed – No Amendments

04/04/2017 House Third Reading Passed – No Amendments

04/05/2017 Introduced In Senate – Assigned to Business, Labor, & Technology

04/12/2017 Senate Committee on Business, Labor, & Technology Refer Unamended to Senate Committee of the Whole

04/18/2017 Senate Second Reading Laid Over Daily – No Amendments

04/19/2017 Senate Second Reading Passed – No Amendments

04/20/2017 Senate Third Reading Passed – No Amendments

05/01/2017 Signed by the Speaker of the House

05/01/2017 Signed by the President of the Senate

05/02/2017 Sent to the Governor

See the bill here

Sponsors: Reps. Foote & Melton, Sen. Guzman

Summary:

Concerning the timing of an inquiry into a job applicant’s criminal history.

The bill applies to employers with 15 or more employees and prohibits those employers from:

  • Advertising that a person with a criminal history may not apply for a position;
  • Placing a statement in an employment application that a person with a criminal history may not apply for a position; or
  • Making an inquiry about an applicant’s criminal history on an initial application.

An employer may obtain a job applicant’s criminal background report at any time.

An employer is exempt from the restrictions on advertising and initial employment applications when:

  • The law prohibits a person who has a particular criminal history from being employed in a particular job;
  • The employer is participating in a program to encourage employment of people with criminal histories; or
  • The employer is required by law to conduct a criminal history record check for the particular position.

The department of labor and employment is charged with enforcing the requirements of the bill and may issue warnings and orders of compliance for violations and, for second or subsequent violations, impose civil penalties. A violation of the restrictions does not create a private cause of action, and the bill does not create a protected class under employment antidiscrimination laws. The department is directed to adopt rules regarding procedures for handling complaints against employers.

Position: Support

Status: 03/29/2017 Introduced In House – Assigned to Judiciary;

04/13/2017 House Committee on Judiciary Refer Amended to Appropriations

04/21/2017 House Committee on Appropriations Refer Unamended to House Committee of the Whole

04/21/2017 House Second Reading Special Order – Passed with Amendments – Committee, Floor

04/24/2017 House Third Reading Passed – No Amendments

04/24/2017 Introduced In Senate – Assigned to State, Veterans, & Military Affairs

05/01/2017 Senate Committee on State, Veterans, & Military Affairs – Postpone Indefinitely

 

See the bill here

Sponsors: Rep. Winter

Summary:

Concerning the creation of a family and medical leave insurance program.

The bill creates the family and medical leave insurance (FAMLI) program in the division of family and medical leave insurance (division) in the department of labor and employment (department) to provide partial wage-replacement benefits to an eligible individual who takes leave from work to care for a new child or a family member with a serious health condition or who is unable to work due to the individual’s own serious health condition.

Each employee in the state will pay a premium determined by the director of the division by rule, which premium is based on a percentage of the employee’s yearly wages and must not exceed .99%. The premiums are deposited into the family and medical leave insurance fund from which family and medical leave benefits are paid to eligible individuals. The director may also impose a solvency surcharge by rule if determined necessary to ensure the soundness of the fund. The division is established as an enterprise, and premiums paid into the fund are not considered state revenues for purposes of the taxpayer’s bill of rights (TABOR).

Position: Support

Status: 03/29/2017 Introduced In House – Assigned to Business Affairs and Labor;

04/11/2017 House Committee on Business Affairs and Labor Refer Amended to Finance

04/19/2017 House Committee on Finance Refer Amended to Appropriations

04/25/2017  |  8:30 am  LSB A  | House Appropriations

04/27/2017 House Second Reading Passed with Amendments – Committee

04/28/2017 House Third Reading Passed – No Amendments

04/28/2017 Introduced In Senate – Assigned to State, Veterans, & Military Affairs

05/03/2017 Senate Committee on State, Veterans, & Military Affairs –  Postpone Indefinitely


See the bill here

Sponsors: Reps. Kennedy & Jackson, Sen. Fenberg

Summary:

Concerning an application screening fee that a residential landlord charges a prospective tenant.

With respect to an application screening fee that a landlord may charge a prospective tenant, the bill:

  • Limits the fee to cover the landlord’s actual costs;
  • Requires the landlord to provide any person who has paid the fee with either a disclosure of the landlord’s anticipated expenses for which the fee will be used or a receipt that itemizes the landlord’s actual expenses incurred. The landlord may provide the person with an electronic receipt, unless the person requests a paper receipt.
  • Requires the landlord to return any amount of the fee that is not used as authorized by law; and
  • Establishes a penalty for a landlord that does not comply with the requirements related to the fee.

Position: Support

Status: 03/31/2017 Introduced In House – Assigned to Finance;

04/17/17 House Committee on Finance Refer Amended to House Committee of the Whole

04/20/2017 House Second Reading Laid Over Daily – No Amendments

04/21/2017 House Second Reading Special Order – Passed with Amendments – Committee

04/24/2017 House Third Reading Passed – No Amendments

04/24/2017 Introduced In Senate – Assigned to State, Veterans, & Military Affairs

05/01/2017 Senate Committee on State, Veterans, & Military Affairs – Postpone Indefinitely

See the bill here

Sponsors: Reps. Salazar & Melton

Summary:

Concerning the creation of the ‘Colorado Right to Rest Act’.
The bill creates the ‘Colorado Right to Rest Act’, which establishes basic rights for persons experiencing homelessness, including, but not limited to, the right to use and move freely in public spaces, to rest in public spaces, to eat or accept food in any public space where food is not prohibited, to occupy a legally parked vehicle, and to have a reasonable expectation of privacy of one’s property. The bill does not create an obligation for a provider of services for persons experiencing homelessness to provide shelter or services when none are available.

Position: Support

Status: 04/03/2017 Introduced In House – Assigned to Local Government;

04/19/2017 House Committee on Local Government – Postpone Indefinitely

 

 

See the bill here

Sponsors: Rep. Salazar

Summary:

Concerning the repeal of Columbus day as a legal holiday, and, in connection therewith, granting state employees a floating holiday day off each October.

Currently, Columbus day is one of 10 legal holidays in Colorado. Section 2 of the bill repeals Columbus day as a state legal holiday. Consequently, in order to maintain the number of days off enjoyed by state employees, section 3 grants state employees an annual ‘floating’ holiday, on a day in October of each employee’s choice, in accordance with rules promulgated by the department of personnel and subject to approval by each employee’s supervisor.

Section 1 contains a nonstatutory legislative declaration, and sections 4 and 5 make conforming amendments.

Position: Support

Status: 04/07/2017 Introduced In House – Assigned to State, Veterans, & Military Affairs + Local Government;

04/26/2017  | 1:30 pm  LSB A  |  House Committee on State, Veterans, & Military Affairs

04/26/2017 House Committee on State, Veterans, & Military Affairs Refer Unamended to Local Government

05/03/2017 House Committee on Local Government – Postpone Indefinitely

See the bill here

Sponsors: Reps. Hansen and Michaelson Jenet, Sens. Merrifield and Fields

Summary:

Urging the immediate rescission of the executive order regarding the entry of foreign nationals into the United States that was issued by the President of the United States on January 27, 2017.

Position: Support

Status: 01/30/2017 Introduced In House;
01/31/2017 9:00am House Floor Work

01/31/2017 House Third Reading Passed – No Amendments

02/06/2017 Introduced In Senate – Assigned to State, Veterans, & Military Affairs

02/07/2017 Senate Committee on State, Veterans, & Military Affairs – Postpone Indefinitely 

See the resolution here

Sponsors: Reps. Danielson and Jackson, Sens. Kerr and Donovan

Summary:

Concerning the designation of April 4, 2017, as ‘Equal Pay Day’ in Colorado, and, in connection therewith, acknowledging the persisting problem of wage disparity among various groups.

Position: Support

Status: 04/03/2017 Introduced In House;
04/04/2017 House Third Reading Passed – No Amendments

04/05/2017 Introduced in Senate

04/05/2017 Senate Third Reading Laid Over to 04/11/2017 – No Amendments

04/11/2017 Senate Third Reading Passed – No Amendments

04/19/2017 Signed by the Speaker of the House – Passed

See the resolution here

Sponsors: Rep. Neville, Sen. Smallwood

Summary:

Concerning the repeal of the ‘Colorado Health Benefit Exchange Act’.

In 2010, pursuant to the enactment of federal law that allowed each state to establish a health benefit exchange option through state law or opt to participate in a national exchange, the general assembly enacted the ‘Colorado Health Benefit Exchange Act’ (act). The act created the state exchange, a board of directors (board) to implement the exchange, and a legislative health benefits exchange implementation review committee to make recommendations to the board. The bill repeals the act, effective January 1, 2018, and allows the exchange to continue for one year for the purpose of winding up its affairs. The bill also requires the board, on the last day of the wind-up period, to transfer any unencumbered money that remains in the exchange to the state treasurer, who shall transfer the money to the general fund.

Position: Opposed

Status: 01/11/2017 Introduced In Senate – Assigned to Finance;
02/07/2017 2:00 pm  |  RM 271  Senate Committee on Finance – Refer Unamended to Appropriations

04/06/2017 Senate Committee on Appropriations Refer Amended to Senate Committee of the Whole

04/10/2017 Senate Second Reading Laid Over to 04/17/2017 – No Amendments

04/17/2017 Senate Second Reading Laid Over to 04/24/2017 – No Amendments

04/24/2017 Senate Second Reading Laid Over to 05/01/2017 – No Amendments

05/01/2017 Senate Second Reading Laid Over to 05/08/2017 – No Amendments

05/08/2017 Senate Second Reading Laid Over to 05/11/2017 – No Amendments

See the bill here

Sponsors:  Sen. Kefalas, Rep. Ginal

Summary:

Concerning mobile home parks, and, in connection therewith, promoting home ownership, protecting property rights, and providing incentives to local governments to preserve and develop mobile home park communities.

Where the home owners within a mobile home park (park) have formed either a homeowners’ association or a cooperative, section 2 of the bill specifies that, not less than 30 days nor more than one year prior to, an owner of a park either entering into a written listing agreement for the sale of the park or making an offer to sell the park to any party must provide written notice to the president, secretary, and treasurer of any homeowners’ association or cooperative of the owner’s intention to sell the park. The bill specifies certain circumstances in which the park owner is not required to satisfy these notice requirements.

During the notice period required by the bill, the owner or management of the park may consider any offer to purchase the park that has been made by a homeowners’ association or cooperative of such home owners as long as the association or cooperative is open to all home owners. The owner of the park may consider any reasonable offer made by an association or cooperative representing the home owners and negotiate in good faith with them. If an agreement to purchase the community is reached during the notice period specified in the bill, the association or cooperative has a reasonable time beyond the expiration of such period, if necessary, to obtain financing for the purchase. The bill explicitly specifies that these provisions do not give any home owner or group of home owners within a park any right of first refusal.

Terms of written rental agreement.

Section 3 permits a written rental agreement for a tenancy in a park to contain a clause that encourages the use of mediation or another form of alternative dispute resolution to resolve any controversy by or among owners, management, and home owners within parks.

Alternative dispute resolution.

In any controversy between management and a home owner of a park arising out of the bill, except for the nonpayment of rent or in cases in which the health or safety of other home owners is in imminent danger, section 4 permits the parties to submit the dispute to another form of alternative dispute resolution in addition to mediation prior to the filing of a forcible entry and detainer lawsuit. The choice of alternative dispute resolution methods is dependent upon agreement of the parties.

Under section 4, the general assembly also encourages the owners and management of parks and home owners within such parks to make use of the state office of dispute resolution to resolve any controversy by or among them in addition to local government agencies and community-based nonprofit organizations that are created and empowered to mediate disputes between or among the owners and management of parks and home owners within such parks.

Subtraction of gain from sale of park from calculation of federal taxable income for state income tax purposes.

For income tax years commencing on or after January 1, 2018, section 5 subtracts from federal taxable income the following amount of the gain recognized from the sale or exchange of a park where the party purchasing the park is a county, municipality, local housing authority, nonprofit corporation, homeowners’ association, or a cooperative:

  • 100% of the recognized gain for a mobile home park with 50 or fewer lots; and
  • 50% of the recognized gain for a mobile home park with more than 50 lots.

Encouragement of the preservation and development of mobile and manufactured home parks through county and municipal master plans.

Recognizing the importance of manufactured housing as an option for many households, under sections 6 and 7

, counties and municipalities, as applicable, are required to encourage through either their master plans or other land use or planning documents adopted by the particular governmental body the preservation of existing parks and the development of new manufactured home parks within their territorial boundaries, including increasing opportunities for parks that are owned by the owners of homes within the park. Whenever an existing park is located in a hazardous area, the county or municipality, as applicable, is required to make every reasonable effort to reduce or eliminate the hazard, when feasible, or to help mitigate the loss of housing through the relocation of affected households.

Position: Support

Status: 01/27/2017 Introduced In Senate – Assigned to State, Veterans, & Military Affairs;
02/13/2017  | 1:30 pm  SCR 357 | Senate Committee on State, Veterans, & Military Affairs

02/13/2017 Senate Committee on State, Veterans, & Military Affairs –  Postpone Indefinitely

See the bill here

Sponsors: Rep. Pettersen, Sen. Zenzinger

Summary:

Concerning prohibitions affecting the student information that school service providers collect.

The bill defines ‘classification information’ as information that identifies the citizenship status or religion of a student or the student’s family. The bill prohibits a school service contract provider from collecting, using, or sharing classification information. With regard to existing statutory exceptions that allow a school service contract provider to share or sell certain student personally identifying information, the bill prohibits the sharing or sale of classification information.

Position: Support

Status: 01/27/2017 Introduced In Senate – Assigned to Education;
02/15/2017 | Upon Adjournment  SCR 352 | Senate Committee on Education

02/15/2017 Senate Committee on Education – Postpone Indefinitely 

See the bill here

Sponsors: Sens. Marble & Neville, Reps. Covarrubias & Williams

Summary:

Concerning holding Colorado government accountable for creating sanctuary jurisdiction policies.

The bill is known as the ‘Colorado Citizen Protection Against Sanctuary Policies Act’. The bill includes a legislative declaration that states that addressing sanctuary jurisdictions is a matter of statewide concern and that makes findings about how sanctuary policies are contrary to federal law and state interests.

The bill states that it is the policy of this state to ensure, to the fullest extent of the law, that the state or a political subdivision (jurisdiction) of the state complies with federal immigration law. In addition, pursuant to a recent presidential executive order, the United States secretary of homeland security has the authority to designate, in his or her discretion and to the extent consistent with law, a jurisdiction as a sanctuary jurisdiction that willfully refuses to comply with federal immigration law. A jurisdiction that violates the following requirements is deemed to be out of compliance with the requirements of federal immigration law and is deemed to have established a sanctuary jurisdiction policy if it:

  • Prohibits, or in any way restricts any jurisdiction, official, or employee from sending to, or receiving from, federal immigration agencies information regarding the citizenship or immigration status, lawful or unlawful, of any individual; or
  • Prohibits, or in any way restricts, a jurisdiction from doing any of the following with respect to information regarding the immigration status, lawful or unlawful, of any individual:
  • Sending such information to, or requesting such information from, federal immigration agencies;
  • Maintaining such information;
  • Exchanging such information with any other federal, state, or political subdivision of the state; or
  • Encourages the physical harboring of an alien in violation of federal law.

A jurisdiction is also deemed to have created a sanctuary jurisdiction policy for purposes of the bill if it is officially notified by the federal department of justice or the federal department of homeland security that it is not in compliance with federal immigration law or if it has been denied federal grant funds based on lack of compliance with federal immigration law.

The governing body of a jurisdiction is required to provide written notice to each elected official, employee, and law enforcement officer of the jurisdiction of his or her duty to communicate and cooperate with the federal government concerning enforcement of any federal or state immigration law. The governing body of any jurisdiction in this state is required to annually submit a written report and affirmation to the department of public safety (department) that the jurisdiction is in compliance with federal immigration law and the provisions of the bill. If the department does not receive those written reports and affirmations, the department is required to provide the name of that jurisdiction to the state controller.

The department is directed to compile and submit annual reports on compliance to the general assembly and to the state controller. The state controller is required to withhold the payment of any state funds to any jurisdiction that is found by the department to have failed to comply with the compliance and affirmation requirement. The state controller shall withhold funds until the department notifies the state controller that the jurisdiction is in compliance.

The department is required to republish on its website, once the information is available, the data reported by the federal immigration and customs enforcement agency that pertains to Colorado on the apprehension and release of aliens from custody as compiled by that agency and reported weekly pursuant to a federal memorandum issued by the federal department of homeland security.

The bill waives governmental immunity against a jurisdiction and against its public employees for personal injuries caused to crime victims as a result of the jurisdiction creating sanctuary jurisdiction policies in violation of the federal law. Governmental immunity is waived and compensatory damages may be awarded under the ‘Colorado Governmental Immunity Act’ to the crime victim if the person who engaged in the criminal activity:

  • Is determined to be an illegal alien;
  • Had established residency in a jurisdiction that had adopted a sanctuary jurisdiction policy; and
  • Is convicted of the crime that is a proximate cause of the injury to the crime victim.

The bill states that nothing in the bill relating to compliance with federal immigration laws and nothing in the ‘Colorado Governmental Immunity Act’ shall be construed to require a jurisdiction or a public employee to violate an applicable court ruling from the United States tenth circuit court of appeals or the United States supreme court regarding the enforcement of any provision of federal immigration law.

The bill sets forth the requirements for determining when an illegal alien has established residency in a sanctuary jurisdiction. An ‘illegal alien’ is defined as a person who is not lawfully present within the United States, as determined by federal immigration law or by a federal immigration agency.

The bill includes a severability clause. The bill takes effect upon passage and applies to acts or omissions occurring on or after said date.

Position: Oppose

Status: 04/03/2017 Introduced In Senate – Assigned to Judiciary:

04/10/2017  Senate Committee on Judiciary Refer Unamended to Senate Committee of the Whole

04/13/2017  | 9:00 am  Senate Chamber | Senate Floor Work

04/24/2017 Senate Second Reading Passed with Amendments – Floor

04/25/2017 Senate Third Reading Passed – No Amendments

04/25/2017 Introduced In House – Assigned to State, Veterans, & Military Affairs

05/03/2017 House Committee on State, Veterans, & Military Affairs – Postpone Indefinitely

See the bill here

Sponsors: Sen. Lundberg

Summary:

The bill specifies that it is not a discriminatory practice for a private business to decline to contract to provide goods or services:

  • That convey a message with which the business chooses not to associate itself or with which the business owner disagrees; or
  • For an event that conveys a message with which the business chooses not to associate itself or with which the business owner disagrees.

Position: Oppose

Status: 04/03/2017 Introduced In Senate – Assigned to State, Veterans, & Military Affairs:

04/12/2017 Senate Committee on State, Veterans, & Military Affairs Refer Unamended to Senate Committee of the Whole

04/18/2017 Senate Second Reading Lost – Postponed Indefinitely

 

 

See the bill here

Sponsors: Sens. Lundberg & Marble,  Reps. Ransom & Saine

Summary:

Concerning the creation of the ‘Women’s Reproductive Information Guarantee for Health and Transparency (RIGHT) Act’.

  • The bill ensures that women are fully and accurately informed about their personal medical conditions regarding their pregnancies and health care options. Current medical procedures already use ultrasound technology to provide information regarding the gestational age of a child in utero. The bill ensures that a woman has the opportunity to see or forego seeing her ultrasound. The bill gives the woman a choice between an abdominal or vaginal ultrasound. The bill allows a woman the opportunity to find a provider of ultrasound technology that will provide the service free of charge. The bill requires that a woman be given full and accurate information regarding her abortion. The bill describes the information that the physician performing the abortion provides to the woman, and gives the woman an opportunity to sign or refuse to sign a receipt of information. The bill requires the abortion provider to provide certain information to the woman at least 24 hours prior to performing an abortion.The bill creates a civil right of action for noncompliance with the requirements, making a physician’s noncompliance with the requirements unprofessional conduct and making a violation of the requirements a crime.

Position: Oppose

Status: 04/03/2017 Introduced In Senate – Assigned to State, Veterans, & Military Affairs:

04/05/2017 Senate Committee on State, Veterans, & Military Affairs Refer Unamended to Appropriations

04/11/2017 Senate Committee on Appropriations Refer Amended to Senate Committee of the Whole

04/13/2017 Senate Second Reading Lost with Amendments – Postponed Indefinitely

See The Bill Here

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